Mindy’s story is truly one of revolution. She went from being an overweight, extremely unhappy young woman who lived on mostly processed junk food, to a confident, healthy vegetarian runner who learns about herself every day as she continues to strive towards her goal of losing 100 pounds. Mindy does not write simply to document her weight loss progress - she writes for others, using her own experiences to touch others and give them real insight into not only what change can look like, but how getting there is far from impossible.
Weight loss for women means making use of down time between activities and work to exercise. Do squats while you fold towels, or do some push ups while you wait for water to boil. Schedule time to get exercise at least three times a week. Write it in your calendar, or put it into your iPhone. Make it fun by exercising with a friend regularly. You might also download an audio book to your iPod and listen to a chapter while exercise.
Forget leaving the New York City lifestyle behind to get fit - Theodora didn’t, despite being on a mission to transform her eating habits from empty calorie consumption of fried food and sweets to one that encompassed exercise and healthy food. Theodora lost over 50 pounds, and shares everything from recipes and food to her love of running and more - all while living the coveted life in the city visiting ballets, balls and bars.
Since June of 2012, John Smith (and we call him John Smith not because that’s his real name, but because he never gives it) has been keeping an online food diary, complete with daily meals, calorie counts and even a “Yummy to My Tummy” rating - a 1-10 rating John assigns for food taste and quality. In his captivating manner of writing, John explains that he started his blog to take himself out of a deep depression that being 700 pounds had caused him. John is a self-confessed recluse who doesn’t work and doesn’t get out much. A shame, because if John’s manner of writing is any indication of his personality, then he is definitely a person worth knowing. Check his blog out for some insight into what a picture of a person trying to escape morbid obesity looks like.
Nathalia is extremely consistent in what she shares - you can count on her to divulge all of the best workouts, what she does (and doesn’t) eat, why diets don’t work, even personal posts like how she overcame compulsive eating. Her transformation photos are truly remarkable, and she does it all by eating clean (but allowing herself two realistic “cheat meals” each week”) and exercising as often as possible. You can also check out the fashion section of her blog to view fun accessories, leggings and tops (also for purchase).
"If your diet consists of lots of sports drinks, sugar-sweetened drinks like fizzy pop and flavoured waters, or sugary foods like chocolate and cakes, it will make losing weight harder. While whole fruits and vegetables are undoubtedly good for you, they can also sometimes cause weight gain if you eat too much, as they have high levels of natural sugars in them. Low-fat food options might have high amounts of added sugar in there too, so make sure to check the food label.
You’re only losing one or two pounds a week. Sustainable weight loss is slow and steady. “It depends on where you start — if you have quite a bit of weight to lose, you tend to lose the initial weight faster,” noted Dr. Steinbaum, “but losing more than a pound a week is quite a bit. A gradual decrease in weight loss implies that your dietary changes are sustainable. If you lose weight very quickly, it means that there has been a calorie restriction or an increase in activity that is really significant, and it is really hard to sustain that.” That’s why so many yo-yo dieters gain the weight back. But aiming for smaller targets can add up to big changes -- and reaps more health benefits than the numbers on the scale suggest. “Even when you lose only 3% of your body weight (six pounds for a 200-pound person), your blood sugar improves; your insulin sensitivity is improved; inflammation goes down; your cholesterol goes down,” said Dr. Arad. “You don’t have to cut down half of your weight; even losing 3% to 5% is an excellent goal.”
You might say Vicki’s weight loss blog is an up-and-comer. She’s using it as a platform to launch herself into meeting her 60-pound weight loss goal, and here’s the thing: she’s doing a darn good job. Reading through her blog, it will become very clear that no matter the ups-and-downs, Vicki’s commitment to losing weight and changing her life is wholesome and candid. She shares her food choices, her exercise routines, her enthusiasm and even the occasional let-down. Her blog is perfect if you’re looking to follow along with someone from the beginning - someone who will very likely get there soon.
It's a great accomplishment to lose half your body weight, as Shauna of The Amazing Adventures of Dietgirl did, but the real beauty is in how she's mostly kept it off for a decade. After regaining 50 pounds, she confronted her emotional issues around eating and now says, "my philosophy boils down to: Do the healthy thing more often than you don't do the healthy thing. It's not about numbers and scales, it's eating well and being kind to myself. Persistence, not perfection. Getting back up when I fall over. Over and over again!"
This magical thinking is colored by the fact that many people are suffering around the state, country and world.  It is colored by the fact that earlier today, I felt anxious –crappy - sad. My practice of feeling my emotions invites me to look to my body and ask what is it exactly I am feeling and where. It feels like a vague sensation that takes root in the center of my chest and upper stomach. It is a moving, undulating sensation.  My eyes feel pressure and teary.  
Always the chubby kid in school, Shelly’s weight struggles followed her well into adulthood. At age 35, she struggled with many obesity-related health issues, including high blood pressure and sleep apnea. After her father died of heart failure and sleep apnea and she heard about 9/11 victims who had to walk down 86 plus flights of stairs, Shelly decided it was time to make a change. She opted for weight loss surgery, started eating healthy and exercising daily. The result? A 158-pound weight loss. Shelly uses her blog as a platform to share her daily triumphs and struggles as she works to maintain her weight, share products she uses to stay healthy and eat right.
So, to drink or not to drink? I say “In moderation." Limit your intake and take the occasional time off from drinking altogether to give your systems a much needed break. Also, consider swapping out some of those high cal choices like fruity mixed beverages (even as cute as the little umbrella is) with some of these lower calorie "fit chick" options.
Gina Harney started The Fitnessista after she’d already lost 40 pounds. At the time, she was in maintenance mode in Georgia where, as she explains it, “healthy options were pretty scarce.” The blog was her way of chronicling how she sought out those healthy choices and often created them for herself. Today, Gina works as a certified personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and weight loss specialist. She loves sharing tips with her readers as they embark on their own journeys toward health. Visit the blog.

Aloe juice aka aloe water has been touted as the new coconut water. The bulk of aloe juice is made with aloe vera gel, water, or tea, and then sweeteners and natural flavors may be added. While aloe vera juice supposedly has health benefits, like weight loss and anti-aging properties, none of these claims have ever been scientifically proven. “Although aloe vera does contain high amounts of antioxidants, it has a slightly bitter, citrus-like flavor which is very difficult to drink on its own,” says Amidor. “It also has diuretic properties, which if taken in large amounts, can lead to loss of potassium from your body, which is potentially dangerous.”
I previously had a very bad relationship with food. I could eat a pack of biscuits, large bag or block of chocolate, large bag of crisps all in one sitting just as a snack and I would often secretly eat in private (looking back, I’m not even sure why I did this). This was the biggest factor for me in my drastic weight gain throughout my teens and when I decided to lose weight I knew the binging had to stop. Even in the early stages of weight loss I had episodes of binges, often when I would be having a ‘cheat night’, for example I would have a pizza for my cheat meal sometimes with a side of fries and garlic bread, but then I would ‘need’ something sweet afterwards so would often have a bar of sharing chocolate then raid the cupboards because I thought ‘I’ve started eating now I may as well continue’. This is still something I am working on, even today, however it is a lot more under control now and I manage it with positive thinking and self belief.
Be choosy about carbs. You can decide which ones you eat, and how much. Look for those that are low on the glycemic index (for instance, asparagus is lower on the glycemic index than a potato) or lower in carbs per serving than others. Whole grains are better choices than processed items, because processing removes key nutrients such as fiber, iron, and B vitamins. They may be added back, such as in “enriched” bread.
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