About: Brian’s struggles with weight are some we can all relate to — the need to get healthy, fit, you name it. But what makes his blog particularly interesting is that his studio apartment doesn’t have a kitchen. That forces Brian to get creative, and all he has to work with is a mini-refrigerator and a Big Boss Rapid Oven. His blog is a way to stay accountable and share recipes that are about as creative as you can get.
Nathalia is extremely consistent in what she shares - you can count on her to divulge all of the best workouts, what she does (and doesn’t) eat, why diets don’t work, even personal posts like how she overcame compulsive eating. Her transformation photos are truly remarkable, and she does it all by eating clean (but allowing herself two realistic “cheat meals” each week”) and exercising as often as possible. You can also check out the fashion section of her blog to view fun accessories, leggings and tops (also for purchase).
Studiopress managed hosting offers so much and I’d recommend them to anyone starting a blog. Like I said, my blogs are managed by Studiopress. Now, I know these plans are a little pricier compared to other hosting companies but the quality isn’t even comparable. If your goal is to become a full-time professional blogger then I think Studiopress is the best solution for you. I suggest taking some time to read more about Studiopress and see what they can offer you.

Oh, I am a young 76, 5’6” tall and this morning, weighed in at 135.6. my goal is 130. I know it will be a challenge as I am not that overweight. I am enrolled in FFL 7-week course and am really doing my best to follow the program. I have haven’t been to the gym for 3 months due to foot problems. Hopefully, an MRI on Friday will reveal the problem and I can resume my gym time. Sorry for this epistly, but wanted to explain all to you in hopes that you can share some home exercises for my stomach area.
Limit foods high in refined carbohydrates and refined sugar (white bread, white pasta, white rice), and replace them with high fibre ‘complex carbs’ – think: whole grains, brown rice, sweet potato, oats, beans and pulses. Fill your boots with as many vegetables as possible – they’re low calorie, high in micronutrients, and the fibre in them will keep you full.
In high school, my body didn’t seem to go through many changes. As far as exercise goes, I stuck with track and field and figure skating. I never exercised outside of whatever practice I was going to during the week. As far as nutrition goes, I had a lot of the same habits as middle school but developed quite a few new unhealthy habits.  Once I could drive and spend late nights with friends, my nutrition was crap. I remember stopping at QT (the best gas station in existence) on the way to every shift to work and getting a drink and snack or candy. I remember meeting friends late at night at whatever fast food joint. I remember ice cream multiple days of week in the summer, snacking after school before dinner, and snacking again before bed. One positive choice I made as a high schooler was when I vowed never to eat fast food meat again (I had to read the book “Fast Food Nation” in an English class and was disgusted about the fast food meat industry and have never missed it since). As far as body image goes, again, I remember feeling overweight and embarrassed, but also being muscular because of figure skating. Again, like middle school, really solid and supportive friends surrounded me so I never felt isolated or disliked because of my weight. However, I would say in middle and high school I never felt confident in my body or loved the way I felt or looked. 
That’s because strength training helps you build muscle, which will replace body fat. In fact, strength training is one of the few activities you can do to spike the amount of calories you burn, even after you’re done with your workout. Bonus: When your metabolic rate becomes faster due to muscle growth, you’ll have a little more wiggle room in your diet if that’s something you struggle with, says Dr. Cheskin.
"Only doing abdominal-focused workouts, like crunches, won’t help you banish the bulge. Belly fat is simply where your body stores energy, so you need to take a whole-body approach to tackle it. HIIT training (high intensity interval training) is a great way to burn fat and get your heart rate up. Squats, burpees and treadmill sprints are all examples to try."

Like I said, all of this revamped progress started in August and the weight loss was slow. Slow like an average of 1 pound a week. Some weeks I would lose 1 or 2 pounds and other weeks I would lose nothing. For a while, I didn't notice any physical changes and if it wasn't for the fact that I was standing on a scale looking at a different number, I wouldn't have any guessed my body was changing. The biggest change for me during this time was not what my body looked like, but what it felt like. I noticed the food I ate (in combination with my work outs) left me with more energy. I felt less sluggish and more ready to take on the day. Completed workouts and nutritious choices filled me with confidence and empowerment.
About: One of the things you’ll notice first when you open up Lori’s blog is that she’s a very visual person — a style that reflects in her posts, which are chock full of photos sharing her fitness, food, travel and more. Lori started blogging about three years ago when she decided to lose 115 pounds. Now, she’s 105 pounds down and went from tipping the scales to doing a triathlon. Quite impressive, especially considering Lori has been overweight all her life. Follow her if you want to read about someone who’s the epitome of success, someone who continues to eat right, stay fit and maintain a huge weight loss. 

Josie’s blog is anything but average. It’s downright laugh-out-loud funny. She uses it as the perfect platform to share all her fun workouts, recipes, tips for success and goofy product reviews with her thousands of followers - all in a comical way you won’t find anywhere else. Check out her YouTube channel too, where she posts hilarious vlogs of her workouts and product reviews.
Although I am not tiny or super duper in shape, I feel that I am finally at a comfortable and healthy weight that I can maintain while being busy and always on the go. My routine over the last year has been to try and eat fairly healthy during the week and then cheat a little on the weekends. If I splurge at one meal, I try and drink a healthy shake or a plate of veggies at the next to “make up for” the last meal. As I said before this is NOT health advice, just how I maintain my weight without counting every calorie. I am  not one of those people with a crazy metabolism who can eat whatever they want so I have to be conscious about it all the time. Boo to any of you who are that way. I am forever jealous. One thing that has really helped me to start losing some again recently has been an alkaline diet. I honestly FEEL so much better too!
Emily’s bubbly, vivacious personality comes through in her writing every single time she posts. As someone who suffered from Binge Eating Disorder, Emily had spent a lifetime hating herself for overeating and constantly battling the number on the scale. So, she decided to do something about it. She started her blog to deal with her emotional eating, learn to love herself and lay it all out there for the world to follow along. And follow along they did. Emily has thousands of followers, and with the healthy mix of vulnerability and sprightly character her writing displays, she is certain to gain many, many more.
I found your blog through one of your SparkPeople comments. For the past few weeks, I’ve been limiting my caloric intake and eating about 900 calories a day, like you had done in the past. I’m also really limiting my carbs and exercising for an hour a day. But then I read your bio and I see that you eat wonderful things like pancakes for breakfast, so now I’m inspired to allow myself to eat good foods! You have a great story and delicious looking recipes, thanks for sharing!

Losing those extra pounds brings a lot of benefits. Improved health lessens medical expenses and allows you to enjoy a better quality of life. However, many people find it difficult to stay on the right path of weight loss. Some people may lack the knowledge, motivation, or support. It’s a good thing there weight loss blogs readily accessible on the internet.
Get enough calcium. Adults typically need around 1,000 milligrams of calcium every day to help maintain muscle and nerve function, and it's necessary for healthy bones and teeth.[21] But calcium may also help prevent the body from storing visceral fat in the abdomen. Though studies have not shown a drastic change in weight due to increased calcium intake, researchers suggest that it may have a small effect in some people. Calcium requires vitamin D to be absorbed into the body; therefore, be sure to get enough vitamin D as well.[22] Sources of calcium include:[23]

Mindy’s story is truly one of revolution. She went from being an overweight, extremely unhappy young woman who lived on mostly processed junk food, to a confident, healthy vegetarian runner who learns about herself every day as she continues to strive towards her goal of losing 100 pounds. Mindy does not write simply to document her weight loss progress - she writes for others, using her own experiences to touch others and give them real insight into not only what change can look like, but how getting there is far from impossible.
Well, you have to be enlightened with this fact – it is all possible! This is why we have come up with the best list you could ever stumble upon, even by accident. It is the list of the best weight loss bloggers for the 2017. This list is comprised of all the weight loss experts, health experts, nutrition experts, fitness coaches, and bloggers who have, through their experiences, shown and proven to everybody that it can all be done, if you have a clear cut goal and your mind fully focused on it.
There’s also the impact fiber has on your gut health. By now you’ve likely heard of the microbiome—the trillions of bacteria that live in your digestive tract. It turns out that a predominance of certain strains of bacteria may encourage inflammation and weight gain, and eating fiber-rich foods can favorably shift this balance. While it’s too soon to say that changing your microbial makeup will prompt weight loss, it’s likely to send a “hey, stop gaining weight,” message.
I previously had a very bad relationship with food. I could eat a pack of biscuits, large bag or block of chocolate, large bag of crisps all in one sitting just as a snack and I would often secretly eat in private (looking back, I’m not even sure why I did this). This was the biggest factor for me in my drastic weight gain throughout my teens and when I decided to lose weight I knew the binging had to stop. Even in the early stages of weight loss I had episodes of binges, often when I would be having a ‘cheat night’, for example I would have a pizza for my cheat meal sometimes with a side of fries and garlic bread, but then I would ‘need’ something sweet afterwards so would often have a bar of sharing chocolate then raid the cupboards because I thought ‘I’ve started eating now I may as well continue’. This is still something I am working on, even today, however it is a lot more under control now and I manage it with positive thinking and self belief.
Research published in the Journal of Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases concluded that following the Mediterranean diet could help to mitigate the harmful effects of belly fat on your heart. Better yet, it boosts the number of healthy bacteria in your gut – a study published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition saw levels rise by up to seven per cent, compared with a western diet.
About: Ruzele’s had weight issues her whole life, but it wasn’t until after her mother passed away in 2011 that the pounds really started to pile on. She ballooned up to 335 pounds and had a rock-bottom moment that led her to where she is today: 50 pounds lighter and on a mission to lose 130 more. Ruzele’s blog posts are short and sweet, but always delightful and full of musings, emotions, progress reports and the occasional vlog (which work oh-so-perfectly). Ruzele’s one to follow if you’re looking for someone who’s accountable and gets to the point, but still leaves you rooting her on day-in and day-out.
I found your blog through one of your SparkPeople comments. For the past few weeks, I’ve been limiting my caloric intake and eating about 900 calories a day, like you had done in the past. I’m also really limiting my carbs and exercising for an hour a day. But then I read your bio and I see that you eat wonderful things like pancakes for breakfast, so now I’m inspired to allow myself to eat good foods! You have a great story and delicious looking recipes, thanks for sharing!

I want to say congratulations to you!!! It’s hard getting up at 5am to workout and you do it! That is fantastic!! Love that you changed your lifestyle, as you know I did the same thing. I feel so much better about myself and I imagine you do too! Thank you again for taking the time to leave a comment. It’s comments like yours that keeps me staying healthy!!
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I’d love to know what shakes you use. I’m a pretty picky eater who struggles to find the healthy options I can have that fit my tastes. I need a shake (protein/veggie/fruit/healthy) that I can suffer through to help me get some nutrients and fill me up when I’m wanting to grab those crackers or chocolate chips instead 🙂 I also need to give up diet soda because I know that enhances my salt/sugar cravings.
On top of exercise, it’s nutrition. I believe they go hand in hand. In the beginning, improving nutrition was just as hard as improving fitness, except for sometimes now I think nutrition is more challenging. Exercising was just 1 - 1.5 hours a day of busting your butt, but nutrition was the remaining 22 hours, so there were way more opportunities to fall short or not eat as well as I could. However, because I think it is important to be optimistic, I will say that there were 22 hours a day to nourish my body with good and healthy foods. It just took me a long time to figure out the best way to do that (and just to clarify, I'm still figuring it out.)
“Under normal conditions, humans absorb only about 80% of the nutrients from the food they eat,” says A. Roberto Frisancho, Ph.D., a weight-loss researcher at the University of Michigan. But, he says, when the body is deprived of nourishment, it becomes a super-efficient machine, pulling what nutrients it can from whatever food is consumed. Start eating again normally and your body may not catch up; instead it will continue to store food as fat.
You inspire me so very much. I have followed you for a couple of months because I love your style and we have so much in common. Pretty sure we have crossed paths when you were doing your bedding line. Today’s post hit home for me so much. I have been meaning to reach out to you seeing if we could ever work together in the future, but things have just been so crazy. I started RB in 2006 and it has been a very hard 10 years. I’m sure you know. I remember seeing you on Shark Tank. The industry is so small when you really look at it. Anyhow, I am rambling. You are so beautiful and I admire you so very much. I have had so many amazing opportunities with my business but honestly I passed them up due to my weight gain. I lost my first husband to cancer at 28 and have since been taking anti anxiety meds. Boy, did your post really hit home. I would love to hear from you! You inspire me like crazy and I know we could probably benefit one another with some designs! I would love to have my company do some work for you! Xoxo, Bridgette
Shelley started her blog on the same day she decided to start what she believes will be her final diet. That day, she weighed 256 pounds—two years later she lost over 110 pounds and was her lowest weight in over 20 years, 146 pounds! Shelley uses her blog as a way to remember all of her successes, failures, plateaus and everything else in between. She’s found tremendous support through the blogging community throughout her weight loss journey and continues to share it all on her blog.
The most important thing you need to do is to program yourself mentally. Don't use a scale to measure your progress. If you work out with weights, you may gain a few pounds while losing inches around the waist. Instead, use that pair of jeans that you want to fit into again, or a pair that fits you now. You'll see a slight change every few weeks, and that should give you confidence.
Not a jock? Find other ways to fit activity into your day: walk to school, jog up and down the stairs a couple of times before your morning shower, turn off the tube and help your parents in the garden, or take a stroll past your crush's house — anything that gets you moving. Your goal should be to work up to 60 minutes of exercise every day. But everyone has to begin somewhere. It's fine to start out by simply taking a few turns around the block after school and building up your levels of fitness gradually.
Be choosy about carbs. You can decide which ones you eat, and how much. Look for those that are low on the glycemic index (for instance, asparagus is lower on the glycemic index than a potato) or lower in carbs per serving than others. Whole grains are better choices than processed items, because processing removes key nutrients such as fiber, iron, and B vitamins. They may be added back, such as in “enriched” bread.
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