I also think its important to note that having portion control is not the same thing as being on a diet. I never considered myself to be on a "diet." I remember a few co-workers asking me what kind of diet I was on and I didn't know how to answer because I never thought of myself of dieting because I still ate all foods that I loved. It was more just eating all foods in moderation. I could still eat a good burger and sweet potato fries if I went out to dinner, drank wine on special occasions, ate dark chocolate and ice cream, etc. I never stopped eating the foods I enjoyed, I just ate them less. 

If you are always on the run and tackle the streets of New York City every day, searching for an everlasting balance between your work and yourself, including your health, this is the blog you need to stop and take a good look at. After diving into a greasy and unhealthy diet and declined every gym membership card that got in her way, Theodora, the creator of this blog, decided to change all of that. So, she went on a search for a happier and healthier life, through her process, she lost about 50 pounds, and discovered a way how to stay fit and healthy while being in the heart of NYC. She started running, took up those membership gym cards, and followed a nutritious meal plan, she finally got to her goal. Now, she is working her dream job, still running through the streets of the Big Apple, and making it all work because she is fitter and healthier than ever before!
To encourage ketone production, the amount of insulin in your bloodstream must be low. The lower your insulin, the higher your ketone production. And when you have a well-controlled, sufficiently large amount of ketones in your blood, it’s basically proof that your insulin is very low – and therefore, that you’re enjoying the maximum effect of your low-carbohydrate diet. That’s what’s called optimal ketosis.
Rebecca’s beautifully-designed blog is quite eye-catching - and so are the words written within it. Rebecca’s blog is all about her personal journey overcoming her past self (a self-proclaimed “emotional binge-eater”) to getting rid of the weight (and emotional baggage) one happy day at a time. She shares all about food she eats, workouts she does, products she likes (and doesn’t like) and all her intimate struggle. She even challenges readers to join in on self-bettering exercises, complete with prize drawings, such as her “13 in 13,” where she invites readers to sign up to set a monthly goal (12) total, and a 13th she discloses when you sign up. Quite creative, and a great way to engage readers.
“While kombucha is wonderful due to its containment of various probiotic strains, many commercial kombuchas are loaded with sugar,” says Auslander Moreno. “Moreover, consumers don’t read serving sizes close enough and what’s depicted on the label can be 2-3 servings within the whole bottle, and sugar content all of a sudden is tripled.” These are the 50 things doctors wish you knew about losing weight.

Mason, A. E., Epel, E. S., Aschbacher, K., Lustig, R. H., Acree, M., Kristeller, J., … Daubenmier, J. (2016, May 1). Reduced reward-driven eating accounts for the impact of a mindfulness-based diet and exercise intervention on weight loss: Data from the SHINE randomized controlled trial. Appetite , 100, 86–93. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799744/

Being in optimal ketosis for a prolonged period of time (say, a month) will ensure that you experience the maximal hormonal effect from eating a low-carb diet. If this doesn’t result in noticeable weight loss, you can be certain that too many carbs are NOT part of your weight issue and not the obstacle to your weight loss. There are, in fact, other causes of obesity and being overweight. The next three tips in this series might help you.
Having support is very important with weight loss. If everyone can get on board, it will be easier to achieve your goals. Talk to your family (or friends, roommates, etc) before starting your diet and let them know your plan. Explain why you are making this decision and ways they can help you succeed. Even if they do not change with you, that's okay! Go forward with your plan! They may decide to join you once they see you succeed with weight loss.

Every time you complete 10 reps on the rowing machine, lift the handles straight up over your head—without bending your elbows—for two consecutive repetitions before returning to normal rowing form. This works your shoulders and back harder, as well as your legs, since they have to produce more power to give you the momentum to perform the move, says McGarr.

Pace around your office while talking on the phone or run into the bank to cash your check instead of using the drive-thru. When researchers at the Mayo Clinic fed a group of volunteers an extra 1,000 calories a day over the course of eight weeks, they found sedentary individuals gained eight times more weight than those who fidgeted a lot during the day.
About: On March 1, 2014, a visit to the doctor’s office really brought things home for Bobby. At 6 feet tall, Bobby weighed in at 345 pounds. To be at a healthy weight, his doctor said he needed to weigh 177 pounds, 168 pounds less than the weight he was at. In essence, Bobby realized he was essentially carrying around another person. The moment was the catalyst he needed to change. Rather than set any unrealistic expectations, Bobby decided to set the small, attainable goal of losing 2 pounds a week. So began his blog. And, guess what? It worked. Two years later, Bobby weighs in at 214 pounds (he looks great, by the way), and continues to take those small baby steps that are helping him achieve a healthy body. Bravo.

When Stephen put his first before-photo out there for the world to see, he really encompassed everything it means to be vulnerable and to trust a community for support. He weighed in at a staggering 632 pounds, a point where many people would just give up. But not Stephen. Instead, Stephen has made his wellness journey a lifestyle. Through eating right and a discovered love for running, he has lost almost 300 pounds (and counting!). His blog is truly touching, and he truly embodies the saying, “It’s never too late.”
Hi Karen! I haven’t dealt with chronic pain and fatigue myself, so my experience is pretty limited in that area. I would encourage you to move however you can without overdoing it. There is a woman who is going through this herself who talk about that here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWiu-u3Liww) and there are all kinds of gentle workouts available. There is a bed workout here (http://www.domorebemore.net/getfit/bed-workout-easy-workout-chronic-pain-fatigue/) and more workout suggestions here (https://www.prevention.com/fitness/fitness-tips/best-workouts-chronic-pain-and-fibromyalgia). I hope that helps!
About: The lessons people learn when they start losing weight are important and meaningful. But it can be tough to articulate them in a way that helps other people with their own weight loss goals. That’s far from the case when it comes to Tim. About 2 years ago, Tim tipped the scales at 295 pounds. Today, he weighs in at about 220 —75 pounds lighter and a whole lot more fit. And that’s what he’s dedicated his blog to, sharing fitness tips and lessons he learned to help others achieve their goals too.
Eat Breakfast Every Day. One habit that's common to many people who have lost weight and kept it off is eating breakfast every day. "Many people think skipping breakfast is a great way to cut calories, but they usually end up eating more throughout the day, says Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author of The Pocket Idiot's Guide to the New Food Pyramids. "Studies show people who eat breakfast have lower BMIs than breakfast-skippers and perform better, whether at school or in the boardroom." Try a bowl of whole-grain cereal topped with fruit and low-fat dairy for a quick and nutritious start to your day.
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