I tracked everything from fat, carbs and protein.  I was eating what I was suppose to and within 5 months, I dropped the remaining 10lbs.  I did it, I met my goal!  As of today, I am trying to maintain my weight, which in my opinion is harder then losing it.  I get so afraid of putting the weight back on, since it’s so easy to lose motivation.  Just because you meet your goal doesn’t mean you can go back to the way it was.  That’s when I decided I needed to make this my lifestyle.  I started reading up on healthy foods, different exercises, and I kept calculating my calories.  I was a true calorie counter, every bite I ate, I tracked it.  If I didn’t know the calories, I wouldn’t eat it.   I was having allot of fun.  I was exercising and maintaining my weight!  Then it happened.  Something was brought to my attention from my friends and family, I was obsessed they told me!  Obsessed with what?  Eating right and exercising?  It was the calorie counting!  People told me I’m not enjoying life if I calculate every bite.  Can I do this forever?  Well, maybe,I am pretty dedicated after all, but who wants to?  I have learned so much over the past couple of years, about eating, exercising and most importantly myself.  I have a lot of will power and I know how to be healthy, so I should be able to do this!!!!  
There’s also the impact fiber has on your gut health. By now you’ve likely heard of the microbiome—the trillions of bacteria that live in your digestive tract. It turns out that a predominance of certain strains of bacteria may encourage inflammation and weight gain, and eating fiber-rich foods can favorably shift this balance. While it’s too soon to say that changing your microbial makeup will prompt weight loss, it’s likely to send a “hey, stop gaining weight,” message.
How would you like to hear something more about Jennifer? She is about 30-ish and lives in Atlanta, Georgia, and she has decided to share all of her experiences with you. In the year off 2009, she managed to weight a bit more than 280 pounds. This is when she said enough. She joined a weight loss programme and just two years later, she could say hi to her new figure and goodbye to 100 pounds that she lost. Even though her goal is to lose 160 pounds, and she is still working on that, Jennifer decided to share her life changing experience with everyone. Besides being a teacher in an elementary school, her part time job is this blog. Here she shares all the recipes, races (because she started running after she lost 100 pounds), the reviews, triumphs, defeats, and her overall journey through which she hopes she can motivate you to start your own journey.

She is a mother, a producer, a writer and a runner! An amazing woman whose story is truly exciting, incredible and will definitely give you a boost if you are seeking a way to start losing some weight and developing a healthier lifestyle habits. Her name is Jennifer Roe and she is one of the most inspirational weight loss bloggers there are. While the life swirled her into a complete mess, being a mother, food lover and a working woman, she suddenly found herself wanting to change and improve all that she is. So, as the nicely puts it, one foot in front of the other, she started making major life decisions and created a healthier habits for her. Actually, not just healthier, she managed to improve her overall self as well as her outlook on life. And the best part of it all is, that by reading her blog and just being a little bit intrigued about her life, she will change yours too!


In January of 2010, I was home from work, and I was flipping through the On Demand channels and I saw a circuit training workout “Boost Your Metabolism” from Jillian Micheals.  I hadn’t a clue who she was, but I did the workout and I thought I was going to die!  I couldn’t walk for 3 days and I was sore as hell.  That’s when I knew I was out of shape and needed to up my exercise, because walking wasn’t enough anymore.  At that time I also started my Getting in Shape 2010 group on Facebook.  I needed a place to share healthy living, get support because I wasn’t getting that at home and to learn from others.
What happens if you fast for a day? What happens if you don't eat for a day? While most people will feel hungry and possibly tired, there is also a range of other effects. In this article, learn about how the body starts to burn fat for energy and whether fasting for 24 hours can be a good weight loss tool. We also investigate the possible risks. Read now
Gina started her blog after losing 40 pounds, although you’d never know it looking at her. She is as fit as they come, which is why her blog title “The Fitnessista” fits the content so perfectly. Her posts are chock full of fun (and often easy) exercise routines, healthy recipes, fashion and what life is like being married to a military man. Gina is also quite the photographer, with numerous photos of yummy-looking food and easy-to-follow photo guides of her newest fitness routine.

Eat polyunsaturated fats. While saturated fat leads to the body's retention of visceral fat, causing abdominal girth and excessive weight gain, studies have shown that a diet high in polyunsaturated fat helps promote the production of muscle mass instead of body fat.[7] Polyunsaturated fats can also help reduce cholesterol levels in the body, lowering the risk of stroke and heart disease.[8] Sources of polyunsaturated fats include:[9]
“If there’s one thing that comes up over and over with the thousands of patients enrolled in the National Weight Control Registry, it’s weighing yourself every day on a scale,” says Rena Wing, Ph.D., founder of the registry, which tracks more than 4,500 men and women who have lost an average of 20lbs or more and kept it off for at least six years. “Don’t obsess over the number,” she says, “but at least keep track of the general range of what you weigh so you can catch small changes as they occur and take corrective measures immediately.”
Eat More Produce. Eating lots of low-calorie, high-volume fruits and vegetables crowds out other foods that are higher in fat and calories. Move the meat off the center of your plate and pile on the vegetables. Or try starting lunch or dinner with a vegetable salad or bowl of broth-based soup, suggests Barbara Rolls, PhD, author of The Volumetrics Eating Plan. The U.S. government's 2005 Dietary Guidelines suggest that adults get 7-13 cups of produce daily. Ward says that's not really so difficult: "Stock your kitchen with plenty of fruits and vegetables and at every meal and snack, include a few servings," she says. "Your diet will be enriched with vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, fiber, and if you fill up on super-nutritious produce, you won't be reaching for the cookie jar."
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