Believe it or not, this amazing woman created this blog because not only she wanted to share her results of how much weight she had lost, but also she wanted to document her every step, just because she may one day forget it. She is originally from California, but lives in Texas for over 20 years now, she is 53 years old and her name is Shelley. She is a mother of two grown up children, and in that area she believes that they both (along with her husband) did a pretty good job. When it comes to her weight loss story, it is quite a fascinating one. She has managed to lose a lot of weight, and reading her blog is the only way to discover how she did it. From running on marathons to swimming and cycling, to doing some mild exercises, her story is quite incredible and definitely worth reading!
Noam Tamir, C.S.C.S, founder of TS Fitness, also says that metabolic resistance training and high-intensity interval training is a solid way to reduce fat all over, including belly fat. “These [types of exercise] help to burn calories during the workout, and they also give you that after-burn effect,” he says. “Plus, they help to change your body composition by increasing your muscle mass.”
In 2010, Kelly decided it was time to make a change. So she started blogging about losing weight. She credits the bulk of her weight loss in those early years to Jenny Craig. Today, she writes about how she manages to keep the weight off. No Thanks to Cake is full of healthy recipes that are sure to make your mouth water. There’s also plenty of inspiration for people starting out on their own weight loss journey.Visit the blog.
Unsurprisingly, the results showed that nothing had happened to the weight of the women receiving calcium or the placebo. However, the group which took the multivitamin lost more weight – about 3 kg more – and improved their health markers. Among other things, their basal metabolic rate (the rate at which the body burns calories when at rest) increased.
Be choosy about carbs. You can decide which ones you eat, and how much. Look for those that are low on the glycemic index (for instance, asparagus is lower on the glycemic index than a potato) or lower in carbs per serving than others. Whole grains are better choices than processed items, because processing removes key nutrients such as fiber, iron, and B vitamins. They may be added back, such as in “enriched” bread.
If antioxidants are the good guys of gut health, trans fats are the supervillains. These sneaky fats actively contribute to your wobbly waist – not just by adding new fat, but by moving fat from other areas of your body to your belly. During a six-year study at Wake Forest University, monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent trans fat diet had 33 per cent more belly fat than monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent monounsaturated fat diet.
Mary started her blog as a way to regain faith in herself. For Mary, weight is a constant battle, losing and gaining and losing some more, Mary intends to make this her last time seeing the numbers on the scale climb. Mary is quite creative with her blog. She even has a section devoted to the rewards she gets when she loses weight, such as a charm bracelet and a manicure (a lesson we could all learn from), as well as a bucket list that includes things like publishing a children’s book and running a 5K. Mary’s blog is one of self-discovery, from questioning why she is a people-pleaser to rejoicing in her own accomplishment - a blog you’ll want to check out for tips on how to do your own inner-reflection.
If your weight-loss regimen consists of giving up the foods you love in favor of a diet of strictly flaxseeds and rice cakes, it's time to reconsider your strategy. There are lots foods out there masquerading as being "healthy" when in reality although they may be better than some other choices, their true nutritional value may not be quite as it seems.
Eat More Produce. Eating lots of low-calorie, high-volume fruits and vegetables crowds out other foods that are higher in fat and calories. Move the meat off the center of your plate and pile on the vegetables. Or try starting lunch or dinner with a vegetable salad or bowl of broth-based soup, suggests Barbara Rolls, PhD, author of The Volumetrics Eating Plan. The U.S. government's 2005 Dietary Guidelines suggest that adults get 7-13 cups of produce daily. Ward says that's not really so difficult: "Stock your kitchen with plenty of fruits and vegetables and at every meal and snack, include a few servings," she says. "Your diet will be enriched with vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, fiber, and if you fill up on super-nutritious produce, you won't be reaching for the cookie jar."
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