Testing your limits brings about than just bragging rights. Lifting a heavier weight for fewer reps burns nearly twice as many calories during the two hours after your workout than lifting a lighter weight for more reps, according to research published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Feel smug in the knowledge you’re still torching calories in that 10am meeting.

Shelly of the World According to Eggface is remarkable for her 158-lb weight loss, which took her from morbidly obese to healthy and happy. But she's even more inspirational for being so open about something a lot of weight-loss bloggers tiptoe around: her gastric bypass surgery. Check out her A Day in My Pouch post to see what it's like eating after this type of weight-loss surgery.
Basically, the effect of exercise on our weight is vastly overrated. That’s why it’s only number 15 on this list. There are other things you need to take care of first. It’s not a good idea to eat bad food, drink sugar water (so-called “sports drinks”) or be on medications which force you to exercise for hours daily just to compensate. Metaphorically that’s like digging a hole, into which you put your ladder, on which you stand and paint the basement-level windows of your house.
About: Sara, a new mom, is all about living a happy, healthy and fun life. She’s struggled with her weight for years, and, as she puts it, can’t wait for the day when weight no longer gets in her way. Sara’s biggest appeal is that she’s all about using good ole fashioned weight loss techniques — eating healthy and exercising. And that philosophy permeates through her blog, inspiring readers and engaging fans along the way.

I am not a “medicine person” AT ALL. Still to this day, I avoid it like the plague. Yet I had been thrust, by our own doing, into this busy, crazy, stressful world so quickly that I didn’t know how to cope. And literally within months, I had gained 60lbs. And that 60 was on top of the weight I had already gained from just “playing” a little too hard. Not partying or drinking or anything, just indulging, traveling and being so busy that fast food was my best friend. By the end of 2006, I topped off around 200lbs. Yes, not the easiest thing to write on a public blog. So here’s the proof…
I think it’s safe to say that blogging has completely changed my life. I started my blog to document my weight loss journey. I shared my experiences with meal prep, make-ahead healthy recipes, along with creating different habits to keep me out of the “hot zones”. I also love to share posts that inspire people to change. My favorite inspirational post is this one on the 4 pieces of advice I’d give my 40lb heavier self.
Her name is Holly, and this is her small but precious corner of the Internet. She will briefly explain to you the reason why you found her blog, and she starts with sharing her love for food. She loves cooking it, eating it, taking pictures of it, but it hadn’t always been easy for her. For a long time in the past, the food was her enemy instead of her friend. She had been a bit overweight, and always on the lookout for the next quick fix, which never resulted positively on her body. This is why she decided to make it better for her by choosing the slow and long, but successful process. The main reason she created this blog is to show all of you that you can do the same and that you, most of all, deserve to be happy with yourself and proud of your appearance! So visit her website for more information and enjoy everything she has to say to you!
Robby’s blog never, ever holds back. As a young woman who has struggled with weight issues since she was 8 years old, Robby doesn’t believe in fad diets or quick-fix schemes, and she’s not afraid to tell you about it. That’s what makes her blog so great. It’s as authentic and real as they come. She also makes her approach easy to follow by itemizing lists that cover everything from her own stats, to how to give yourself an overhauled mindset, to weight loss updates and more.
Write down everything you eat this week. People who keep food diaries, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, lose an average of 6 pounds (2.75 kg) more than people who don't keep a record of everything that they eat.[10] So force yourself to write down the good, the bad and the ugly. Keep these tips in mind:
I also think its important to note that having portion control is not the same thing as being on a diet. I never considered myself to be on a "diet." I remember a few co-workers asking me what kind of diet I was on and I didn't know how to answer because I never thought of myself of dieting because I still ate all foods that I loved. It was more just eating all foods in moderation. I could still eat a good burger and sweet potato fries if I went out to dinner, drank wine on special occasions, ate dark chocolate and ice cream, etc. I never stopped eating the foods I enjoyed, I just ate them less. 
Trim Portions. If you did nothing else but reduce your portions by 10%-20%, you would lose weight. Most of the portions served both in restaurants and at home are bigger than you need. Pull out the measuring cups to get a handle on your usual portion sizes, and work on paring them down. Get instant portion control by using small bowls, plates, and cups, says Brian Wansink, PhD, author of Mindless Eating. You won't feel deprived because the food will look plentiful on dainty dishware.
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