Andra takes a unique approach to her blog. She doesn’t just write posts to write them, she makes sure her readers have something extremely interesting to read. Andra credits her readers and her blog with taking her from an unhappy, unhealthy person to a vibrant, fit woman who lost over 90 pounds and continues to keep it off. Andra doesn’t believe in “magic bullets” to lose weight, but rather takes a common-sense approach that incorporates healthy eating, fitness, dealing with emotions and much, much more.
I am not one to read blogs, but I stumbled upon yours and just read your entire story (and many of your other posts). I am nearly in tears at how inspiring you are! You have such an amazing outlook at the entire weight loss journey. I have struggled my entire life with my weight and I am so glad that you gave me a different way to look at it. It isn’t about a true end goal, but a complete lifestyle change. So from the bottom of my heart, I want to say thank you! You have impacted me and my mindset in a positive way! I pray that your fitness lifestyle continues to inspire those that cross paths with you!
1 Reference for 5%: Blackburn G. (1995). Effect of degree of weight loss on health benefits. Obesity Research 3: 211S-216S. Reference for 10%: NIH, NHLBI Obesity Education Initiative. Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults. Available online: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/ob_gdlns.pdf Cdc-pdf[PDF-1.25MB]External
It's a one-time investment you'll never regret. Here's why: Strength training builds lean muscle tissue, which burns more calories — at work or at rest — 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The more lean muscle you have, the faster you'll slim down. How do you start strength training? Try some push-ups or a few squats or lunges. Use your free weights to perform simple bicep curls or tricep pulls right in your home or office. Do these exercises three to four times per week, and you'll soon see a rapid improvement in your physique.
Jen grew up overweight and spent year after year jumping from one diet to the next and back again. Tired of being obese, Jen started her journey in August 2007 to not just diet, but actually change her lifestyle. She left the excuses behind, actually listened to what nutritionists said, began exercising and eating right - all while documenting it for the world to see online. Now, Jen has turned her success in health into success in business - turning her blog into a place where she not only shares her own daily ventures, but is host to other “prior fat girls” as they share their journey too.

Roni starting blogging in 2005 as a way to stay accountable on her personal weight-loss journey. Six years later, she still blogs, but her mission is to inspire others and share her ideas to live a lighter, healthier life. Roni does this through openly and honestly chronicling her weight loss, health, and fitness goals. Roni also founded FitBloggin’, a conference to bring new and seasoned health and wellness, fitness, and weight-loss bloggers together for knowledge, personal growth, and networking. It's clear that Roni is committed to living a healthy lifestyle and sharing her passion with others. I'm so glad to know her professionally and personally.
One of the most attention-grabbing things you will notice about Michelle’s blog is her story. It’s about more than just weight loss, it’s about a young woman’s path to self-acceptance as well. As a teen, Michelle was told she was overweight even when she wasn’t, and subsequently entered into young adulthood fulfilling her own negative self-image. She then spent years going up and down in her weight, gaining and losing, and finally decided a blog would be a great way to keep herself accountable and maintain her weight for life. She went from 233 pounds to under 138, and keeps it off by running, updating her weekly weigh-ins and even competing in triathlons.

” But Ben’s life has changed since he settled on the choice to get solid in 2008. He began running and has since contended in marathons and Ironman occasions. In 2019, he decided on the beautiful choice to stroll over the United States from L.A. to Boston. Come here for enterprise, photographs, and exhortation on working out and carrying on with a healthy lifestyle.
Sick and tired of yo-yo dieting and trying all sorts of products that offered quick fixes to a lifelong problem, Kate decided to change her life for good. And she did. She adopted a new outlook on life that involved eating right, exercising in moderation and truly enjoying the process along the way. That common-sense mindset is what helped Kate lose 120 pounds and maintain that weight loss for years. Her blog not only discusses her personal journey to healthy living, but also includes deep reflections and discussions around topics that contribute to poor self-image, such as the media’s depiction of what perfection looks like. Quite worth following.
Real talk: It could take weeks or months to see the metabolic effects of exercise on the scale, and even then, building muscle, which is denser than body fat, could lead to weight gain. "Do what you like because it’s good for you," Dr. Seltzer says, noting the way exercise is awesome for your heart, mental health, and more—and that not all measure of progress can be seen on the scale.
Losing belly fat shouldn’t mean strict dieting or deprivation. “People often think that you have to eat certain foods or avoid certain foods [to lose weight] and in reality, it comes down to eating more of a balanced diet that is portion- and calorie-controlled,” says Zeratsky. “This allows your body to have enough energy to do what it wants to do while managing weight.”
About: Let’s start with Katie by rewinding three years to January 2013 when she hopped on the scale and realized she weighed 247 pounds. That was the moment that “something just clicked” for Katie. Fast forward back to the present, Katie lost 100 pounds, dropped six pants sizes and along the way found a fierce determination to pursue (and stick with) her fitness goals. Katie found her purpose, and she uses her blog to fulfill that purpose: helping others who struggle with obesity, weight loss and food addiction.

Soon after the ski trip, I left my desk job to pursue graduate school and took a part-time job working at the front desk of an upscale health club. One of the perks was a free membership, which was the motivation I needed to take control of my weight. I started exercising at the health club most mornings, taking Body Pump and spinning classes on a regular basis. Finding workout buddies helped too. I made some new friends who were avid runners and I began training for and participating in road races with them.

Thank you so much for this. I really appreciate how honest you are! I read a lot of stories and the answer is something like “I cut out soda and started walking” and they don’t talk about the really hard work, food choices, portion control, maintenance, etc. I’m also a person who can’t just eat anything & over the course of my marriage have gained a lot of weight – there’s something about weirdly trying to “keep up” with my much taller/larger husband who has a completely different metabolism! We are about to move & I finally feel really motivated to make changes in my lifestyle. I also appreciate that you are honest about your skin removal – so many people aren’t!!
Working in an office means I am often surrounded by cakes, biscuits, sweets and other tempting goodies. Sometimes I will have a small treat but most of the time I resist and stay on track. What I find most difficult about this is the comments I receive from others. For example, if they notice I haven’t eaten a treat they will say ‘Chloe why haven’t you had one?’, there is almost peer pressure to eat something just because everyone else is (which sounds crazy but it’s true!) Don’t fall into the trap of eating something for the sake of it or due to peer pressure, if you don’t want it then don’t eat it – in 5 minutes other people won’t even remember if you have eaten their cake or not! Another tip which I find useful is to say ‘no thanks I don’t eat that’ rather than ‘I can’t eat that’ which implies you’re not allowed or your restricted, saying ‘I don’t’ implies that you are in control.

The sad truth is that conventional ideas – eat less, run more – do not work long term. Counting calories, exercising for hours every day and trying to ignore your hunger? That’s needless suffering and it wastes your time and precious willpower. It’s weight loss for masochists. Eventually almost everyone gives up. That’s why we have an obesity epidemic. Fortunately there’s a better way.
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