Sorry, I should have read those articles on carbohydrate in full first before I got on my soap box. They’re inaccurate too. In 2015 the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), advisors to the UK government, did a meta-analysis of all the best research and found none of the effects on health, i.e. heart disease, cancer and diabetes, reported by small scale studies and the likes of Robert Lustig. Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-carbohydrates-and-health-report
I am not as much in favor of ‘forgiving’ as you mention. Let’s be honest about realizing that if you want good health, stop giving in to the miriad of food temptations. I am in my 70’s and hear all the time from my contemporaries that they think keeping to a good eating regime is only necessary if one has a ‘health problem’. The most valuable asset we all have the potential to possess is good health.
If you want to shrink your gut, get enough protein in your diet. In this case, about 25 percent of calories. Why? For starters, protein makes you feel full and helps you build muscle (which increases metabolism, thereby making it easier to lose weight). Just as important, high-protein diets have been shown to be the best way of attacking belly fat. In one study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, Danish researchers put 65 people on either a 12 percent protein diet or a 25 percent protein diet. The low-protein dieters lost an average of 11 pounds, which isn't bad. But the high-protein subjects lost an average of 20 pounds--including twice as much abdominal fat as the low-protein group.
The nutritionist has slowly led me into a ketogenic diet and within 2 months my PSA has gone from 8 to 6.6 and the latest reading is 6.0. I have gone from 62 kilos to 58 kilos in about 2 weeks and it is fair to say that I do not feel hungry although I have one meal or at most 2 meals a day. I jog almost every day for about 60 minutes keeping my heart rate above 120. My diet bothers everyone else but not me.

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If you are seeking some extra boost for your activities, wanting to slim down a bit or even are struggling with big weight issues, you are either way at the right place. The creator of this blog is called Katie, and this is her story. In the year of 2009, she was considered an obese person. She had 253 pounds, and she was feeling miserable. So, while seeking a way out of her misery she decided to put all the effort and hard work and start running. Combined with an excellent dieting plan, within a period of 16 months she had lost 125 pounds and guess what – she did not feel miserable anymore! But, in order to achieve a kind of balance between her sweet tooth and the fear not to gain back the weight she had lost, she seriously turned to running. Doing her best to keep her weight as it is, she created this blog to be her journal after the period of struggling with weight issues.

In a way, moderate-intensity physical activity is that "magic pill" a lot of people are looking for, because the health benefits go beyond keeping your waistline trim: Not only can it reduce your risk of cancer, stroke, diabetes and heart attacks, but studies have shown that physical activity can significantly improve the moods of patients with major depressive disorders.
Frozen meals are super-convenient. They’re cheap, easy to throw in your bag as you’re running out the door, and take just three minutes to cook. While your 300-calorie Lean Cuisine may seem like a waist-friendly option, it’s not. Most frozen meals are loaded with sodium—as much as you should eat over a full day, not just in one meal—and lots of other synthetic additives. Sodium packs on water weight, as the body needs to maintain a balance in the body, and when you’re thirsty, you could reach for a sugary beverage, which adds hundreds of more calories. Salt also makes food taste better, prompting you to shovel more of it in your mouth. Another problem with frozen meals is they frequently lack sufficient fiber to keep you full, so you’re likely to find yourself sneaking back into the kitchen shortly after you’ve eaten. If you must eat a frozen meal, consider adding a serving or two of frozen vegetables to boost the fiber and fullness quotient and dilute the sodium.
I also think its important to note that having portion control is not the same thing as being on a diet. I never considered myself to be on a "diet." I remember a few co-workers asking me what kind of diet I was on and I didn't know how to answer because I never thought of myself of dieting because I still ate all foods that I loved. It was more just eating all foods in moderation. I could still eat a good burger and sweet potato fries if I went out to dinner, drank wine on special occasions, ate dark chocolate and ice cream, etc. I never stopped eating the foods I enjoyed, I just ate them less. 
Eat Breakfast Every Day. One habit that's common to many people who have lost weight and kept it off is eating breakfast every day. "Many people think skipping breakfast is a great way to cut calories, but they usually end up eating more throughout the day, says Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author of The Pocket Idiot's Guide to the New Food Pyramids. "Studies show people who eat breakfast have lower BMIs than breakfast-skippers and perform better, whether at school or in the boardroom." Try a bowl of whole-grain cereal topped with fruit and low-fat dairy for a quick and nutritious start to your day.
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