You are thinking about changing your lifestyle and habits all the time. But you never seem to know where to start from. Well, how about trying to visit this blog in order to help yourself out? Meet Lori – she is hoping that her blog will be entertaining to you as the journey is to her. What she does is she basically documents her journey on her path of changing her lifestyle completely! She wants to create a different and a healthier body and way of living for herself. Her blog is the real deal – Lori carefully and thoroughly describes her dieting plan, exercising and how she manages to cook the meals herself in order to know what she is consuming. The best part of it all is that she describes how she deals with all the struggles and obstacles that come her way.
A you could have already guessed it here, the name of the blogger who created this blog is Brie, but what you did not know about her is that she is a twenty two year old graduate who also takes her own photos for her blog, and is a healthy blogger. She will show you, in a very interesting way, how to take better care of your body through whole foods and a lot of sweaty workouts. Here you will learn ho to say goodbye to the diets where you have to count your calories and to night where all you dream about is food. Here you will learn how to look t the food as a fuel to your body, and how to best spend that fuel to make your body as good as you want to. If you want to feel good, first start on the inside, and work your way out. This is what this blogger has mastered doing – creating a better picture for herself and definitely helping you create a better picture for yourself too!
After losing 40 pounds, certified personal trainer Gina Harney was on the hunt for guides on weight maintenance. But at the time, her options were limited. So she started The Fitnessista, which is focused on fitness advice and healthy recipes that only sound indulgent (think: pecan pie oatmeal, pumpkin pie protein smoothie bowl, and chocolate protein donuts).
Any movement counts. The numbers are daunting: The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans suggest a minimum of 150 minutes (2.5 hour) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week (walking briskly, playing doubles tennis, raking leaves), or 75 minutes (one hour, 15 minutes) of vigorous-intensity activity (running, a strenuous fitness class, carrying groceries up stairs), as well as muscle-strengthening activities (resistance training and weightlifting) two days a week. But if you want to lose weight, work up to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week, or 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity. “But doing something just a few minutes a day to get started has benefits,” said Piercy. “So parking farther away when you’re running errands, getting up from our desks and going down the hall instead of sending an email -- those are things people can start incorporating into their daily lives now that may be a little easier than saying, ‘Oh my gosh, I have to figure out how to fit 2.5 hours of activity into my week.” If you are starting from zero physical activity, Dr. Jakicic suggests taking a 10-minute walk five times a week, shooting for 50 minutes a week, and building on from there once it becomes habit.

Fighting belly fat is 80% healthy diet. Reduce calories by filling yourself up with protein, vegetables, whole grains, and replacing bad habit snacks with good ones. For example, if you have a sugar craving, replace your calorie laden latte with a Muscle Milk lite, one of my favorites, because it has zero sugar and a ton of protein that will satiate while also torching my sugar craving! Another great trick is a sprinkle of cinnamon in your morning coffee or oatmeal- the spice has been shown to help stabilize blood sugar. It also slows the rate at which food exits the stomach, which helps you feel fuller longer.
Andie Mitchell is a writer, healthy recipe developer, and New York Times bestselling author of “It Was Me All Along”, a memoir documenting her 135-pound weight loss journey. Andie’s blog is a truly inspiring compilation of life lessons, mindset, healthy habits, recipes, and real advice on maintenance, thoughts on depression and anxiety, and how to navigate the struggles of a weight loss transformation.
About: The truth is we all love a good success story — they show us what other people, real people that went through the same things we did, were able to achieve. They also give us ideas on how we can kickstart our own weight loss journey and succeed. The Weigh We Were is a one-stop shop for all those stories, real stories from other people who lost weight, plus how they did it. It’s just the place to get ideas from similar people to see what might work and what won’t.

If you are always on the run and tackle the streets of New York City every day, searching for an everlasting balance between your work and yourself, including your health, this is the blog you need to stop and take a good look at. After diving into a greasy and unhealthy diet and declined every gym membership card that got in her way, Theodora, the creator of this blog, decided to change all of that. So, she went on a search for a happier and healthier life, through her process, she lost about 50 pounds, and discovered a way how to stay fit and healthy while being in the heart of NYC. She started running, took up those membership gym cards, and followed a nutritious meal plan, she finally got to her goal. Now, she is working her dream job, still running through the streets of the Big Apple, and making it all work because she is fitter and healthier than ever before!
About: Their blog may be described as just “another” runner, but it’s anything but. The blog is chock full of tips, advice, nutrition information — and lots of personalized posts — from “mothers” who banded together to run, and realized just how much they loved it. The blog also works as a personal cheerleader, a way to connect with moms and women who started running (grumbling), tolerated it, started to like it (there are moments) and ultimately fell in love (addiction level).
Growing up, I never thought too much about weight, exercise, or nutrition. Thinking back to my body’s past, I was on the heavier side most of my life. I was never extremely overweight, but never skinny. I remember the occasional times of filling my mind with negative thoughts related to body image, but I never considered it to be a serious problem. I remember the times of being frustrated in a fitting room or embarrassed looking at a picture of me with several of my skinny friends. I remember really wanting to look different and form healthy habits, but in the end, I never had enough motivation to make a change.
Be choosy about carbs. You can decide which ones you eat, and how much. Look for those that are low on the glycemic index (for instance, asparagus is lower on the glycemic index than a potato) or lower in carbs per serving than others. Whole grains are better choices than processed items, because processing removes key nutrients such as fiber, iron, and B vitamins. They may be added back, such as in “enriched” bread.
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