It's a great accomplishment to lose half your body weight, as Shauna of The Amazing Adventures of Dietgirl did, but the real beauty is in how she's mostly kept it off for a decade. After regaining 50 pounds, she confronted her emotional issues around eating and now says, "my philosophy boils down to: Do the healthy thing more often than you don't do the healthy thing. It's not about numbers and scales, it's eating well and being kind to myself. Persistence, not perfection. Getting back up when I fall over. Over and over again!"
Beth is a weight loss blogger and is doing an amazing work. She has basically struggled with weight issues through her entire life, so that is the reason why she has lost a bunch of pounds over time, gained them, and lost them again. Right about now she has sinked into her weight losing process and gained a couple of pounds more than she should, so the weight loss process is on again! She tends to make herself as healthy as possible, so this is her path – how to become fit in the shortest period possible but in a natural way. Her blog is filled with all sorts of recipes that will ease your way into getting fit and reaching your goal. The easier way how to navigate your life back on track and into well-being is finally here! Check out her work and learn everything you need to know about feeling good and looking good!
In August of 2010, one of my members of Getting in Shape 2010 group recommended I joined Sparks People.  I thought what the heck, since my virtual trainer was giving me issues.  Well I set up my profile, entered how much exercise I do a week, and what my goal was and guess what?  It calculated how many calories I needed to lose 1.5 lbs a week.  Don’t forget I was eating only 1200 calories a day.  Sparks told me I needed to eat 1550 at the low end and 1700 on the high end.  I was so happy, I could eat!!!!  It was like a new world opened up for me.

What can I eat on a no-carb diet? Many people reduce carbohydrate intake to help them lose weight. Carbohydrates are important macronutrients, but cutting them can help people to lose weight by making it possible to reduce calories and improve feelings of fullness. Alternatives to carbs can make it easier to stick to a low-carb diet. Learn more here. Read now

About: Kaylen may be young, but she’s knows her way around a kitchen. She has a passion for food and loves experimenting to find new ways to make recipes healthier. Her blog comes after many years of following other healthy living blogs and has a host of scrumptious, easy-to-follow recipes. Plus, she tosses in the occasional fitness routine, too. In short, it’s a true breath of fresh air.
About: The lessons people learn when they start losing weight are important and meaningful. But it can be tough to articulate them in a way that helps other people with their own weight loss goals. That’s far from the case when it comes to Tim. About 2 years ago, Tim tipped the scales at 295 pounds. Today, he weighs in at about 220 —75 pounds lighter and a whole lot more fit. And that’s what he’s dedicated his blog to, sharing fitness tips and lessons he learned to help others achieve their goals too.
I’m a USAF Viet vet; 66 years of age; diagnosed with hernias (surgery not required now); nerve impingement that I just fully recovered from (it happened a couple of months before the diabetes diagnosis). Now I have to rebuild atrophied leg muscles from when the nerves were not innervating the muscles in my left side – the feeling in my arm came back the next day, but numbess from waist down on left side for a few months – some chiro, mainly a lot of scans (MRI, cardiac ultr-sound, etc.) to insure that it wasn’t a stroke.
I wasn’t happy at my heaviest, but I wasn’t really motivated to do anything about it until a ski trip with friends in 2004 put things in perspective. The vacation was a blast, but I quickly lost my getaway glow when I saw photos from our trip. Looking at the physical proof, I was embarrassed by how much weight I had gained. Every photo was a “bad” photo of me. I was so depressed that I threw most of them away.
Get enough calcium. Adults typically need around 1,000 milligrams of calcium every day to help maintain muscle and nerve function, and it's necessary for healthy bones and teeth.[21] But calcium may also help prevent the body from storing visceral fat in the abdomen. Though studies have not shown a drastic change in weight due to increased calcium intake, researchers suggest that it may have a small effect in some people. Calcium requires vitamin D to be absorbed into the body; therefore, be sure to get enough vitamin D as well.[22] Sources of calcium include:[23]

An intriguing blog about a nurse who claims that she can function throughout her entire day on a low carb dieting plan. Her name is Anne, and she is the creator of this unique blog. Thankfully, the times are always changing, so we can always learn something more and something new about obesity as well as dieting and losing weight. This woman is certain that in the future, we will look at all the compounds of the foods in a different way, but until that day comes, she recommends the diet she has put together for herself, by herself. Always trust your body and your instincts, and see what food suits you the best. Yes, you will experiment at the beginning, but in the end it will all be worth it, because you would end up changing your dietary plan to the needs of your body and creating a better image for yourself, inside and out.

About: Two years ago, January hit rock bottom. She came to the realization that she was a food addict. A few days (and a whole lot of cookie dough) later, January joined Overeaters Anonymous and turned to God to overcome her gluttony and addiction, blogging about it to hold herself accountable. Today, January’s a champion for God and using faith to shed unwanted pounds.


Fiber is found in beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, veggies, and whole grains and foods rich in fiber tend to lend themselves to weight loss. At the moment, just 10 percentof Americans are hitting fiber targets of around 25 grams per day. Studies that track what people eat over time suggest that there’s a connection between weight and fiber intake, with higher fiber intakes linked to lower body weights (the reverse is true, too). One review of 12 studies found that supplementing the diet with more soluble fiber helped people slim down. Another year-long study found that people who followed the simple suggestion to eat 30 grams of fiber each day lost about 5 pounds.
There needs to be more people like you. I know too many people that give up soon after starting their quest to weight loss. What they do not seem to understand is that their expectations are being negatively influenced by the media promoting it. What I mean is, a number of the weight loss companies always show a male or a female with shredded bodies that imply that the customer will look the same way over night. The truth is, like Tony Horton said in his original P90X, “Rome was not built in a day and neither was your body”. People need to understand that true change will take weeks, months, and even years. A few years ago, I followed the original P90X program and was able to lose 25 pounds. I felt amazing, however, soon after I stopped the program, the weight came right back. In my personal situation, I may have lost the weigh too fast. I was eating small meals, but always seemed to feel hungry. I was depriving myself of what I liked, therefore when I stopped, all of my old eating habits came back. Your new technique is great and I hope more people read you post to inspire a healthier life style, thereby, helping to minimize the U.S. obesity problem. Thank you
Sarah Dussault is a mother, a Certified Personal Trainer, Holistic Health Coach, and full-time health and wellness blogger and YouTuber. Her mission is to help young women learn how to eat clean and get fit so they can feel confident about the way they look, without depriving themselves of a social life. She shares fitness videos, healthy recipes, mom stuff, and health and fitness for pregnancy all on her blog!
So it’s no wonder that losing weight and getting in shape are among the most popular resolutions year over year, because so many people can’t keep them; 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by February. So Moneyish spoke with several leaders in the field of obesity research and prevention who have reviewed the science surrounding weight gain and loss to explain what to eat and avoid; how much exercise you need and which workouts work best; as well as their tips for making these moves a part of your new, well-balanced life in the New Year.

Nontraditional pastas, like those made from beans, rice, and soy products, have become increasingly popular as a healthier option for pasta fans. However, that doesn’t mean you can load up on veggie noodles with no consequences. “We would be wise to remember that these pastas, while more nutrient dense than traditional white pasta, still have calories and carbohydrates,” says Monica Auslander Moreno, MS, RD, LD/N, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition. “Portions are still set at a measly 1/2 cup cooked; most of us do 2-3 cups of cooked pasta at a time. Try going ‘half and half’ with pasta alternatives and a vegetable pasta substitute.” Check out these weight-loss breakthroughs doctors wish you knew.


About: Normally, we’d skip right on over a blog that doesn’t identify the author’s name, but the woman authoring “Frantic at Forty” gave us pause. Why? Because her story is one that so many can relate to — a woman about to enter midlife trying to make sense of things and lose weight. The author started the blog just before she turned 40 as a way to stay accountable while she started out to give herself the only gift she wanted — thin. She’s lost plenty of weight, and, even more importantly, found some happiness in the process. We just hope that turning 40 doesn’t mean an end to her blogging.
When Tufts University researchers studied the waistlines and diets of 459 people, they found that even in men of similar age and activity level, those who ate white bread frequently weighed more than those who didn’t. “The calories from white bread and refined grains just seem to settle at the waistline more than calories from other foods,” says Katherine Tucker, Ph.D., the study author.
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Top Quote: "I’m sharing every lesson to getting there—not as a drill sergeant and definitely not as a guru—as a friend who gets it and never wants anyone else to struggle alone. I’ve learned more in the last ten years than I ever thought possible, and I’m laying it bare here, one post a time—every lesson I’ve learned on losing weight,real advice on maintenance, thoughts on depression, how I’ve moved beyond binge eating, lifestyle bits that make me feel good inside and out, and all the healthy recipes I make regularly.”
1000 crunches a night may get you strong abdominal muscles, but with a full layer of fat on top, you will not get the results you really want. Instead of all those crunches, do exercises that engage multiple muscle groups and work your cardiovascular system. Try planking, where you hold yourself in a push-up position, resting your forearms on the ground. Try 3 or 4 sets of holding for 30 seconds each. Getting up and moving throughout the day by going for walks will also help.
Before I really get into the content of this post, I should note that throughout my weight loss journey, I have learned a lot about nutrition, fitness, mental wellness, and body image. There are some things that I will mention that worked really well for me that might not work as well for other people. What started out as a journey to weight loss has evolved into a journey of an overall healthy and balanced lifestyle.
Her name is Jennifer and she is an amazing blogger, a mother of a girl, and a keeper of two dogs. She works in a medical device office and in the spare time she loves cooking and of course, being with her family. But what she absolutely loves the most, and is proud of it, that with the help of exercise and a great meal plan, she lost a bunch of pounds. The blogging is her way of helping her keep the pounds off, all the while giving her readers something interesting to try – new recipes, all the time! Naming her blog peanut butter and peppers seemed like the right thing for her to do, because she loves both of these things, and can literally put them on anything! So, if you are interested in her struggle with weight loss, or how she got into calorie counting, how she’s trying to get out of it, her every day fun recipes and little victories, it is all here – and it will provide you with the motivation you need!
The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.
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